vrijdag 8 januari 2016

2016

 

 
This issue continues the Postal Service's tradition of floral-themed stamps that are popular with mailers. The stamp art features ten different floral designs, each a detail of an illustration that appeared in an American nursery catalog between 1891 and 1912

This new Priority Mail Express stamp depicts the grandeur of the Columbia River Gorge. Approximately 80 miles long and up to 4,000 feet deep, the gorge runs along the Columbia River, which forms part of the border between Oregon and Washington.
The stamp art captures the beauty of the Columbia River as it winds its way through the steep cliffs of the Cascade Mountain Range. The historic Vista House, sits atop Crown Point, overlooking the river 725 feet below, seen on the stamp in the setting sun.
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This issue celebrates soda fountain favorites—the cold, sweet treats beloved by people of all ages. The booklet of 20 features four each of five different illustrations: a double-scoop ice cream cone, an egg cream, a banana split, a root beer float, and a hot fudge sundae.
The geometric silver-toned patterns in the selvage and on the booklet cover evoke a classic chrome-accented soda fountain.
 

The American flag has long symbolized the strength and spirit of the United States, and many Americans like to use these stamps on their outgoing mail and see them on incoming mail. The Postal Service, therefore, always tries to have Flag stamps available to individual and volume mailers.
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The moon, the Earth's only natural satellite. has long had considerable impact on mankind. Its gravitational pull creates ocean tides and affects our planet's motions. A full moon occurs approximately every 29.5 days when the moon is opposite the sun, with Earth between the two. Since the rotation and orbit periods of the moon are the same, the same part of the moon is always seen from Earth.
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This new one-cent definitive stamp features two Albemarle Pippin Apples on a branch surrounded by leaves. The Newtown Pippin is an American apple originated in the late 17th or early 18th century
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This new five-cent definitive stamp features two clusters of deep-purple Pinot noir grapes growing on vines among several green leaves.
Identified as a French wine grape, it is now grown in other regions including Oregon and California in the United States. Translated from the French, "pinot" is "pine", for the pine-cone shaped clusters in which the grapes grow, and "noir" is "black".
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This new ten-cent definitive stamp features two red pears on a white background. The two most common red pears grown in the United States are the red Anjou, similar to green Anjous in all respects other than color; and red Bartlett pears, referred to as "Summer Pears" for the time of year in which they are harvested.
 

This stamp celebrates the 200th anniversary of Indiana's statehood.
Known as the Hoosier State, Indiana became the 19th state of the Union on December 11, 1816. According to the USPS, "Indiana has often been considered the heartland of America…Its fertile soil has long made it ideal for crops like corn, which remains a staple of Indiana's agricultural economy." For this reason, the stamp features a photograph of the expansive cornfields near Milford, Indiana, at sunset. The state also is known for the Indianapolis 500 and its devotion to basketball.
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Born December 31, 1930, Jaime Escalante was a beloved, charismatic California educator who used unconventional methods to inspire his inner-city students not only to learn calculus but also to pass Advanced Placement tests in the subject. With his colleagues at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, he proved that students judged to be "unteachable" could master even the most difficult subject.
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This new Priority Mail stamp features one of Puerto Rico's many magical and mysterious caves. The stamp art depicts a sunset view of La Cueva del Indio, or the Cave of the Indian, which is located near Arecibo on Puerto Rico's north coast. The cave gets its name from the great number of engravings, known as petroglyphs, found on its walls.
 

This issuance recognizes America's love of pets. The stamp art for the Pets booklet features 20 existing photographs. Each photograph represents an animal from these groups: puppies, betta fish, iguanas, hamsters, goldfish, parrots, guinea pigs, tortoises, rabbits, kittens, corn snakes, mice, hermit crabs, chinchillas, gerbils, dogs, parakeets, horses, cats, and geckos.
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These four new stamps feature these rugged and reliable work vehicles:
The 1938 International Harvester D-2, with its barrel-shaped grill and styling that mirrored the look of luxury automobiles of the era.
The 1953 Chevrolet, which featured large windshields that provided drivers with excellent visibility, a distinctive curvy grill that bulged in the middle, and a six-cylinder engine.
The 1948 Ford F-1, which included features like the roomy "Million Dollar Cab," a sharp horizontal five-bar grill, and a six- or eight- cylinder engine.
The 1965 Ford F-100, which had a grill that featured 18 small rectangular openings. It also featured what Ford dubbed "Twin-I-Beam" independent front suspension.
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This issue showcases some of the more visually compelling full-disk images of the planets obtained during this era of space exploration.
All eight planets are shown; Pluto, no longer a "planet". is not.
Some stamps show the planet's "true" color—what we might see with our own eyes if traveling through space. Others use colors to represent and visualize certain features of a planet based on imaging data.
Still others use the near-infrared spectrum to show things that cannot be seen by the human eye in visible light. The verso text explains the images and identifies the spacecrafts and telescopes that helped obtain them.
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This issue recognizes the history-making first reconnaissance of Pluto in 2015 by NASA's New Horizons mission. This souvenir sheet contains two new stamps. The first stamp shows an artist's rendering of the New Horizons spacecraft. The second shows the spacecraft's striking image of Pluto near its closest approach.
The view, which is color-enhanced to highlight surface texture and composition, is a composite of four images from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager, combined with color data from the imaging instrument Ralph. It clearly reveals the now-famous heart-shaped feature.
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In the spirit of Halloween, the U.S. Postal Service issues these stamps featuring photographs of four brightly lit jack-o'-lanterns that were carved by Paul Montanari.
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The stamp features a heart that was created using the ancient art of quilling. Quilling involves rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper, laying them on their edges, and gluing them in place to form intricate designs. The heart shape in the center of the stamp art is made from paper strips of many colors and is surrounded by white paper swirls on a white background.
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This issue commemorates the 250th anniversary of the repeal of the Stamp Act, British legislation that galvanized and united the American colonies and set them on a path toward revolution. The act required payment of a tax on a wide array of paper materials, such as newspapers, pamphlets, legal documents, licenses, mortgages, contracts, and bills of sale. A stamp would be embossed on these papers to indicate payment. The stamp art depicts a crowd gathered around a "liberty tree" to celebrate the repeal of the Stamp Act. The selvage area displays a proof print of a one-penny revenue stamp and includes a famous slogan from the era: “Taxation without representation is tyranny,” a theme that has once again become popular with some groups of citizens.
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Born February 14, 1760, Allen was a preacher, activist, and civic leader. This stamp coincides with the 200th anniversary of Allen's founding of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, one of the most important institutions in African-American life, and his election as its first bishop. The stamp art is a portrait of Allen, a detail from an 1876 print titled "Bishops of the A.M.E. Church." Featuring Allen in the center surrounded by ten other bishops and six historical vignettes, the full print is from the collection of the Library Company of Philadelphia.
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Born March 27, 1924, Sarah Vaughan was one of America's greatest singers, successful in both jazz and pop, with a talent for improvisation and skillful phrasing and a voice that ranged over several octaves.
The stamp art is an oil painting of Vaughan in performance based on a 1955 photograph by Hugh Bell. The cover side of the pane features a larger version of the stamp art and a list of some of "The Divine One's" popular songs. The stamp will be issued at the Sarah Vaughan Concert Hall.
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With names like Blazing Star, Touching Stars, and Starburst, stars are one of the most popular design motifs for American quilters. These stamps feature two versions of one of those favorites, the Lone Star pattern.
Each stamp shows a detail from a photograph of one of the two quilts highlighting the intricate work involved in creating the star design.
The quilt top is created by stitching together many small diamond shaped pieces of fabric. The quilts featured in the stamp art were made by Amish quilt makers.
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Celebrating the television show Star Trek on the 50th anniversary of its premiere, these four new stamps showcase four digital illustrations inspired by elements of the classic program: the Starship Enterprise inside the outline of a Starfleet insignia; the silhouette of a crewman in a transporter; the silhouette of the Enterprise from above; the Enterprise inside the outline of the Vulcan salute, Spock's iconic hand gesture.
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Shirley Temple  April 23, 1928 – February 10, 2014) was an American film and television actress, singer, dancer, and public servant, most famous as Hollywood's number-one box-office star from 1935 through 1938
Temple began her film career in 1932 at the age of three. In 1934, she found international fame in Bright Eyes, a feature film designed specifically for her talents. She received a special Juvenile Academy Award in February 1935 for her outstanding contribution as a juvenile performer to motion pictures during 1934, and film hits such as Curly Top and Heidi followed year after year during the mid-to-late 1930s. Licensed merchandise that capitalized on her wholesome image included dolls, dishes, and clothing. Her box-office popularity waned as she reached adolescence. She appeared in a few films of varying quality in her mid-to-late teens, and retired completely from films in 1950 at the age of 22. She was the top box-office draw in Hollywood for four years in a row (1935–38) in a Motion Picture Herald poll
 
 
 

With the 20th stamp in the Legends of Hollywood series, the Postal Service honors actress and diplomat Shirley Temple Black. As a child, Temple was the most famous film star in the world. As an adult, Black had a distinguished career in diplomacy, serving as a delegate to the United Nations, U.S. ambassador to Ghana and Czechoslovakia, and U.S. Chief of Protocol.
The stamp art features a painting based on a 1935 still image from Curly Top, one of her iconic movie roles. The selvage feature a publicity photo from the 1933 short film "Managed Money".
Held approximately every ten years, the first International Philatelic Exhibition to be hosted by the United States was held in New York CIty in 1913. These souvenir sheets commemorates the 11th International stamp show to be held in the U.S., from May 28 to June 4, 2016, at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City
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New York artist Kim Mak once again brings us a design that features a traditional form of Lunar New Year celebration. The stamp art features two bright reddish-orange peonies against a purple background. Peonies symbolize wealth and honor in Chinese culture and often decorate the sides of the traditional drums played during the holiday festivities.
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This Christmas stamp features a detail of Madonna and Child, a 15th- century tempera-on-panel painting in the Widener Collection at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The painting is dated to circa 1470, and its anonymous artist is known only as "a Follower of Fra Filippo Lippi and Pesellino."
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The Nativity stamp art depicts a peaceful image of the Holy Family silhouetted against a dawn sky. The baby Jesus lies in a straw-filled manger in the center of the picture. A bright star shines over the scene. The Gospel of Luke relates how Mary and Joseph traveled to Bethlehem to register for the census decreed by the Roman emperor, and with no room in the inn, Mary gave birth to Jesus in a manger.
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This stamp commemorates the two most important festivals—or eids—in the Islamic calendar: Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. The gold-colored calligraphy on the stamp was created by world-renowned calligrapher Mohamed Zakariya. It reads Eidukum mubarak, "May your Eid be bountiful (or blessed)." The calligraphy on previous Eid stamps issued by the USPS read Eid mubarak, "may the religious holiday be blessed."
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The 2016 Hanukkah stamp features an illustration of a holiday menorah in the window of a home. The menorah is viewed as if from inside a room, looking through a window to the outside. The candles—one for each of the eight nights and days of Hanukkah, and the ninth, the shamash or "servant," used to light the other candles—have all been lit.
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2016 marks the 50th anniversary of Kwanzaa. The 2016 stamp continues its tradition of honoring an annual holiday that celebrates African- American family, community, and culture. Bold colors are intended to depict a young African-American woman as the embodiment of Africa. In front of the woman sits a large purple bowl overflowing with fruits and vegetables, symbolizing the abundance of African first harvest celebrations that inspired the creation of Kwanzaa.
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Info USPS